Feng Shui Mirrors

Feng Shui Mirrors

Frequently, Feng Shui practitioners in America utilize mirrors as a cure. We consistently see mirrors being used upon the recommendation of a prior “master.” According to one web site, “Mirrors are known to be the aspirin of Feng Shui” (Although I tend to think of them as placebos). What do these mirrors do and how do they affect the Feng Shui in a house or business?

Let me first start out with saying that 168 Feng Shui Advisors recommends the use of mirrors as a bathroom tool to comb your hair by. Beyond that, mirrors only serve a visual or artistic effect. Mirrors have been misrepresented as a Feng Shui “cure” by a lot of practitioners. Here in this country, these practitioners claim that feng shui mirrors will reflect negative Chi and spirits. Have you ever tried to reflect heat with a mirror, or perhaps x-rays? Mirrors only reflect light, a narrow area of the energetic spectrum. Chi, defined as “life energy,” flows around and through each of us, is not diverted by a four inch, eight edged mirror.

Using Feng Shui Mirrors

Mirrors have a useful nature. They can be used to hide pillars, to expand the appearance of a room, and to be used in a piece of art. A small restaurant in Monterey Park, California, which we frequent, uses mirrors to hide the support pillars of the restaurant. Without the mirrors, the pillars would divide the room and make the restaurant appear smaller. While this is an architectural remedy, but has nothing to do with the chi of the building. It can be said that from a Feng Shui perspective, it does create a better environment. After all, Feng Shui is about creating a more comfortable and supportive environment. Let me clarify, while mirrors might be recommended as a visual change, they are not a remedy against bad chi.

Traditional Feng Shui utilizes only the five elements of wood, fire, earth, metal, and water as remedies to energetic issues in a house or building. Mirrors do not play any part as a remedy. Often you will see mirrored baguas opposing each other on two houses that face each other. Sometimes there will be a bagua feud – the bigger bagua wins. This is not Feng Shui, but rather superstition mixed with egotism. Traditional Feng Shui does not subscribe to mysticism, superstition, or religion.

Clearing up the mystery of Feng Shui Mirrors

So how did mirrors get mixed into Feng Shui concepts? It is very likely that one of two things (or perhaps both) created this belief in mirrors. First, in the Middle Ages, mirrors were made of polished brass. A master would suggest that you need a mirror in a certain area. It was not the mirror, but rather the brass (metal element) that would create the remedy.

Another very likely misunderstanding is a very well known Feng Shui book title: “Eight House Mirror Theory.” This book says nothing about mirrors as a remedy, but rather, it infers that after performing calculations based on the eight directions, you will have the answer before you as clear as a mirror. Again, people who knew about this book, but did not know or understand its contents probably took the title as a literal recommendation.

Mirrors as stated above, can create an architectural or artistic effect, but are not to be mixed with Feng Shui remedies. If you are looking for a Feng Shui practitioner, be wary of those who prescribe mirrors as a solution to your Feng Shui woes.

Yin and Yang Theory

Yin and Yang Theory

The concept of Yin and Yang is one of the most fundamental and profound theories of Feng Shui. It is the Chinese perspective of balance and continual change. Many Feng Shui practitioners claim they have a deep understanding of this concept, yet they cannot even represent the image correctly. In fact, this is a good indicator of the depth of knowledge a “master” possesses. Many times these practitioners call themselves masters, yet their printed materials contain an incorrect Tai-ji (The name for the Yin and Yang circle) representation. How can one call themselves a master of Feng Shui and not even understand the basics of this deep and extremely significant diagram? Yin and Yang is a foundation theory for Feng Shui that supports many other theories including the Five Elements theory and the Environment. Hopefully by reading this, you will be better informed on what Yin/Yang theory is in Feng Shui.

What the Western version of Yin and Yang might be

A western perspective on yin and yang

Yin and Yang are dependent opposites that must always be in balance. The opposites flow in a natural cycle always replacing the other. Just as the seasons cycle and create a time of heat and cold, Yin and Yang cycles through active and passive, dark and light, etc. Yin and Yang evolved from a belief of mutually dependant opposites that cannot live without the other. The Eastern view of opposites is, if you will excuse the pun, opposite of a Western view. If Yin and Yang are balanced and flowing in the East, in the West (if a similar philosophy were adopted), it might look like the image to the right.

We in the West tend to look as things as black “or” white, right “or” wrong, etc. There is separation and unrelatedness in the Western perspective. Whereas, the Chinese view opposites as evolving and cycling. There is neither right or wrong, but rather there is balance, transformation, interaction, and dependent opposition. We need both to maintain a balance.

Symbolism

Yin and Yang can further be explained as a duality that cannot exist without both parts. The chart below shows some of the many opposites that are contained in such a simple symbol.

yin and yang

After the Yellow Turban rebellion (184 A.D.), the Han dynasty emperors commissioned scholars to re-examine the ancient texts. The principles of which Dong Zhongshui (?179-104 B.C.) and others interpreted the ancient texts were derived from the early philosophy of nature, the complementary alternating forces of Yin and Yang, dark and light, female and male, which maintain the balance of the cosmos, and which had been a thought pattern of the Chinese before any philosophical schools came into being.1 Meaning, that Feng Shui and Yin and Yang concepts were evolving from cosmological and environmental sciences before Daoists philosophy adopted it. Many people believe that it was a Daoist invention.

Within Yang, there is a small piece of Yin. Within Yin, there is a small piece of Yang. Just as in the heart of winter, a seed lays in wait to become life, so is Yang waited within Yin for its turn. In a hot summer, a sudden desert storm can bring coolness. This too is an example of how Yin is found in Yang. Again, there are no absolutes, just cycles in time.

An excellent book on this topic is Heaven and Earth in Early Han ThoughtYin and Yang.

Understanding a small piece of the true nature of the Tai Chi symbol

5 Element cycle

These Han dynasty scholars examined the ancient texts and discovered that their forebearers already had a logical and cyclical explanation for the Yin and Yang beyond the morality and philosophy. The first initial observations were of the changes of the seasons. Then expanding these observations the directions were explained. Then cycles in nature were further explained as the cycle of the Five elements.

From a solar perspective, the Sun rises in the East, reaches its peak overhead and sets in the West, then the symbology of the Tai-ji can be represented as right. Furthering that; Spring gives way to new wood, Summer brings fire and heat, Autumn cools like metal, and lastly snow (frozen water) brings the coldest time or Winter. It can also be seen that heat rises and coolness settles.

From a directional perspective, in the Northern Hemisphere (and from a Chinese perspective) the hottest direction is the South and the coldest is the North. Meanwhile all of this occurs with Earth being the center point.

An elemental perspective is a productive cycle of five elements. Creating this productive cycle of elements we see that:

  • Wood burns producing Fire.
  • Fire leaves behind Earth.
  • Earth is the source of Metal.
  • Metal liquefies into flowing liquid like Water (or another explanation is that Metal when cooled it creates condensation, such as a car left out on a cool night).
  • Water then becomes the nourishment for the Wood.

Now you see that there is a lot of depth and meaning to this simple symbol. Many times this symbol is represented as shown below. If heat rises and cool settles, how can Feng Shui “masters” use it on their web sites, in Feng Shui books, and in their classes classes etc.?

Incorrect Tai Ji Incorrect Tai Ji

Incorrect! Heat does not flow down and cool does not rise!!

Without understanding the conceptual view of Yin and Yang, one cannot properly utilize five elements. Since the five elements are the basis of the energetic representations and are the (only!) corrections utilized in Feng Shui, next time you see this incorrect version of the Tai-ji, question the information you are receiving.

For an authentic Feng Shui Consultation, please contact us today.

1. Morton, W. Scott, China Its History and Culture, McGraw Hill, 1995

Yin and Yang